What’s so Amazing about Grace? Part 2

There’s nothing more enjoyable than the unexpected break. So, as I have one this morning, I wanted to go ahead and reflect on one of those three points I made on grace. I know there’s more to grace than just my three little points, but for the sake of having something to connect to grace, I came up with three.

Grace is Expensive

If you have ever read What’s So Amazing about Grace by Philip Yancey, you may be familiar with the story of Babette’s Feast. It’s featured prominently in the very beginning of the book, and it created an indelible impression in my mind as to the cost of grace. To paraphrase the story, a French woman escaping from the French Civil War makes her way to a small Danish fishing village populated by a very puritan sect of Christians. She serves diligently with the leaders of the village in the kitchen for her room and board. Her fortunes change when she is notified by some friends in Paris that her ticket has won the French lottery. She asks the leaders if she could finally prepare a real French meal for the village. She does so, and as the villagers eat her delicious meal, they begin to repair old wounds, and are able to come together in a way that would never have happened.

The finale of the story is touching. As the leaders thank Babette and express their sadness over Babette’s assumed departure (she did win the lottery after all :), Babette drops the bombshell that she had spent her entire lottery earnings of 12,000 Francs on the village feast!

The story reminded me very much of O. Henry’s The Gift of the Magi. In both instances, someone gave up something very valuable in order to give an unmerited gift to another person. The point of both stories is the simple point of grace. And in much the same way, God gave a very precious price for us to experience His grace. The cost of His grace was the life of His only Son. So, what does that mean for us?

Well, I immediately think of the number of gifts I have received over the years, and I start to realize a few things. One, gifts that have been given to me that are very valuable and expensive (like my new ESP guitar) are highly precious to me, and I do everything I can to cherish those gifts. Likewise, the giver of the gift also makes the gift more important to me. My wife’s gifts to me (like the guitar, so you can imagine just how precious that guitar is to me 🙂 are held in MUCH higher esteem than gifts from places like the National Gardening club (like a set of Fiskar’s sheers). Finally, the longevity of the gift is important, as well. Someone giving me a box of Toffifay (don’t get me wrong, I love Toffifay) is not going to make the impact of someone giving me a study Bible, because the Toffifay will last about thirty seconds around me. The Bible will last far longer.

Now, what does all of this mean? Well, we have been given a gift from God (the ultimate being) that cost Him His Son (the ultimate price), that will affect us eternally (the ultimate in longevity). How does that affect your opinion of God’s grace? Is it something to treat like a tie from your kids? Or is it more important than that? I think it’s of infinite importance, and it is big enough that it should affect our way of seeing our entire lives. We should live out our lives in such a way that it says we are aware of the preciousness of God’s grace, unwilling to profane it by our silliness, and unwilling to hide it from the world that has not experienced God’s amazing grace.

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